Pakistan: Fails To Protect The Rights Of Religious Minorities.<br>Released by the US Bureau of Democracy

Image

The Constitution (which was suspended following the October 1999 coup) provides for freedom of religion, and states that adequate provisions are to be made for minorities to profess and practice their religions freely; however, the Government imp

There were no significant changes in the Government's treatment of religious minorities during the period covered by this report. The Government fails in many respects to protect the rights of religious minorities. This is due both to public policy and to the Government's unwillingness to take action against societal forces hostile to those that practice a different faith. In January 2002, the Government announced plans to abolish the separate electorate system, under which non-Muslim voted in national elections for non-Muslim candidates. Minority leaders and human rights groups had requested the elimination of the separate electorate system for years, on the grounds that it disadvantaged religious minorities. President Pervez Musharraf announced the reinstatement of joint electorates, ending a 15-year practice of preventing religious minorities from voting for local representatives in the provincial and national assemblies.

However, on June 26, 2002, the Government proposed constitutional amendments that seek to restore the discretionary powers of the President and the Governors. With this new amendment, the President may dissolve the National Assembly, and the proposal also seeks to eliminate 10
reserved National Assembly special seats for Christians, Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, Parsis, other non-Muslims, and Ahmadis. Acts of sectarian and religious violence continued during the period covered by this report. A number of massacres in churches and mosques brought into question the Government's ability to prevent sectarian and religious violence. The worst religious violence was directed against the country's Shi'a minority, who continued to be disproportionate victims of individual and mass killings.

Specific government policies that discriminate against religious minorities include the use of the "Hudood" Ordinances, which apply different standards of evidence to Muslims and non-Muslims and to men and women for alleged violations of Islamic law; specific legal prohibitions against Ahmadis practicing their religion; and blasphemy laws that most often are used against Muslims and Ahmadis. The number of cases filed under the "blasphemy laws" continued to be significant during the period covered by this report. A Christian nongovernmental organization (NGO) reported that 58 cases were registered during 2000 and 2001, compared to 53 cases during 1999-2000.

Relations between different religious groups frequently are tense, and there were a number of deaths attributed to sectarian violence during the period covered by this report.

You May Also Like

Image

Pope Francis gives thousands of rosaries to Christians in Syria

Vatican City: August 15, 2019.  (CNA) Pope Francis announced Thursday that he is giving 6,000 blessed rosaries to Catholic communities in Syri

Image

Pope Francis: Free women from the slavery of prostitution

Vatican City: August 1, 2019. (Vatican News) Pope Francis contributes the preface to a new book on human trafficking, entitled "Women crucifie

Image

Pope stress on prayers in Church

Vatican City: June 28, 2019. (CNA). The Sacred Heart of Jesus wishes to welcome all into ‘a revolution of tenderness’ through life-chan



"Trial of Pakistani Christian Nation" By Nazir S Bhatti

On demand of our readers, I have decided to release E-Book version of "Trial of Pakistani Christian Nation" on website of PCP which can also be viewed on website of Pakistan Christian Congress www.pakistanchristiancongress.org . You can read chapter wise by clicking tab on left handside of PDF format of E-Book.

nazirbhattipcc@aol.com , pakistanchristianpost@yahoo.com